Books, Quality

In the last couple of months I’ve been learning about what information can I extract from a codebase. I’ve written some articles on how to use NDepend to extract a static view of the system’s quality. But this view is based only on the current state of the codebase. What about source code history? What can it tell us? How has the code changed? These are exactly the kind of questions that Adam Thornhill‘s book, Your Code as a Crime Scene: Use Forensic Techniques to Arrest Defects, Bottlenecks, and Bad Design in Your Programs, tries to answer.

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Books, Quality

I have been using static code analyzers for a while now. While these are useful, you need to spend a lot of time analyzing warnings and issues. And the problem is that, after you first run one of the static code analysis tools on a legacy project, you are overwhelmed by the number of issues. Object-Oriented Metrics in Practice, by Michele Lanza and Radu Marinescu, shows us how to use metrics effectively. It shows how to combine metrics in order to spot design flaws. This book also presents some novel visualization techniques. These are a great way to understand and visualize a complex system.

Object-Oriented Metrics in Practice

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Quality

In a previous blog post we discussed why building the right product is hard and some tips on how to achieve a high perceived integrity. But if you’re building a strategic solution that should support your business for many years, this is not enough. With time, new requirements get added, features change and team members might leave the project. This, together with hard deadlines, means that technical debt starts to incur, and the price of adding new features increases until someone says it will be easier to rebuild the whole thing from scratch. This isn’t a situation you’d like to be in, so that’s why it is important to build the product right.

Building the product right

In their book, Mary and Tom Poppendieck define this dimension of quality as the conceptual integrity of a product. Conceptual (internal) integrity means that the system’s central concepts work together as a smooth, cohesive whole.

How can you maintain the conceptual integrity of a product during its lifetime? You rely on communication, short feedback loops, transparency and empowered teams. These are the same principles that can lead to a high perceived integrity. The only difference is that you apply them at an architectural and code level. Continue Reading

Quality

If you ask a hundred developers to define software quality, you’ll probably get a hundred different answers. There are a lot of ways to categorize quality, but one that I find most useful is building the right product and building the product right.

Building the Right Product

First we have to make sure we are building the right product. The most performant and secure product, having the cleanest and most extensible architecture, covered with unit tests and acceptance tests is in vain if nobody uses it.

In their book, Lean Software Development: An Agile Toolkit, Mary and Tom Poppendieck define this dimension of quality as the perceived integrity of a product. Perceived (external) integrity means the totality of the product achieves a balance of function, usability, reliability, and economy that delights customers.

Traditionally, when customers want to build a product, they talk with business analysts and write down the requirements. These documents are then handed over to architects, who then define the high level architecture and pass the design documents down to programmers who start implementing. There’s a gap between each step and as we go through the process, we lose more and more information and our chances of building the right product get slimmer.

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Books

Writing good tests is hard. Writing good specification is even harder. On my current project we treat test code with the same care we treat production code (which should be the norm on all projects), but we could still improve the readability, reliability and maintainability of our test suite.

With this in mind, Fifty Quick Ideas to Improve Your Tests by Gojko Adzic, David Evans and Tom Roden was the perfect choice for our book reading club. I’ve previously read Gojko’s Specification by Example, which really helped me better understand BDD and how to use it in practice, so I had high hopes for this book.

50 quick ideas to improve your tests

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